Sunday, July 31, 2011

2010-2011 School Year Finis

11th Grade Daughter
  • Algebra II
  • Latin III
  • Physics I
  • Ancient History
  • Ancient Literature
  • Ancient Government
  • Ancient Worldview
  • Ancient Finearts
  • Awana Club/LIT 
Books Read by 11th Grade Daughter
  • Selections from Ancient Egyptian Literature
  • The Ancient Egyptians by Lila Perl
  • Unwrapping the Pharoahs: How Egyptian Archaeology Confirms the Biblical Timeline by John Ashton and David Down
  • Selections from The Feasts of Adonai by Valerie Moody
  • Grand Canyon: A Different View by Tom Vail
  • Footprints in the Ash: The Explosive Story of Mount St. Helens by John Morris and Steven A Austin
  • Selections from The Story of Civilization I: Our Oriental Heritage by Will Durant
  • Gilgamesh
  • The Feasts of Adonai
  • Selections from Mythology: Timeless Tales of Gods and Heroes by Edith Hamilton
  • Selections from The Story of Civilization II: The Life of Greece by Will Durant
  • The Ancient Greece of Odysseus by Peter Connolly
  • The Iliad by Homer
  • The Odyssey by Homer
  • Selections from The Story of Painting
  • Selections from The Story of Architecture
  • Selections from Gardner's Art Through the Ages: Western Perspective, Volume I
  • Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, Deuteronomy, Joshua, Judges, Ruth, I Samuel, II Samuel, I Kings, II Kings, Ezra, Nehemiah, Esther, Job, Psalms, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, Isaiah, Jeremiah, Lamentations, Daniel, Hosea, Joel, Amos, Obadiah, Jonah, Micah, Nahum, Habakkuk, Zephaniah, Malachi, Matthew, I Timothy, II Timothy, Titus, I John, II John, III John
  • The Ancient City by Peter Conolly
  • Warfare in the Classical World by John Warry
  • The Oresteia (Agamemnon, The Libation Bearers, The Eumenides) by Aeschylus
  • Medea by Euripides
  • The Apology of Socrates by Plato
  • Crito by Plato
  • Selections from Invitation to the Classics
  • Oedipus the King
  • Antigone
  • Plato's Republic
  • Aristotle's Poetics
  • Selections from Aristotle's Politics
  • Alexander the Great
  • Selections from The Story of Civilization III: Caesar and Christ by Will Durant
  • The Punic Wars-Osprey Publishing
  • The Aeneid by Virgil
  • The Ancient Celts
  • On the Nature of Things by Lucretius
  • On Anger by Senaca
  • Church History in Plain Language
  • Foxe's Book of Martyrs
9th Grade Son

  • Algebra I
  • Latin II
  • Biology I
  • Ancient History
  • Ancient Literature
  • Ancient Government
  • Ancient Worldview
  • Ancient Finearts
  • Awana Club/LIT 

Books Read by 9th Grade Son
  • Selections from Ancient Egyptian Literature
  • Selection from The Ancient Egyptians by Lila Perl
  • Unwrapping the Pharoahs: How Egyptian Archaeology Confirms the Biblical Timeline by John Ashton and David Down
  • Selections from The Feasts of Adonai by Valerie Moody
  • Grand Canyon: A Different View by Tom Vail
  • Footprints in the Ash: The Explosive Story of Mount St. Helens by John Morris and Steven A Austin
  • Selections from The Story of Civilization I: Our Oriental Heritage by Will Durant
  • Gilgamesh
  • The Feasts of Adonai
  • Selections from Mythology: Timeless Tales of Gods and Heroes by Edith Hamilton
  • Selections from The Story of Civilization II: The Life of Greece by Will Durant
  • The Ancient Greece of Odysseus by Peter Connolly
  • The Iliad by Homer
  • The Odyssey by Homer
  • Selections from The Story of Painting
  • Selections from The Story of Architecture
  • Selections from Gardner's Art Through the Ages: Western Perspective, Volume I
  • Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, Deuteronomy, Joshua, Judges, Ruth, I Samuel, II Samuel, I Kings, II Kings, Ezra, Nehemiah, Esther, Job, Psalms, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, Isaiah, Jeremiah, Lamentations, Daniel, Hosea, Joel, Amos, Obadiah, Jonah, Micah, Nahum, Habakkuk, Zephaniah, Malachi, Matthew, I Timothy, II Timothy, Titus, I John, II John, III John
  • The Ancient City by Peter Conolly
  • Warfare in the Classical World by John Warry
  • The Oresteia (Agamemnon, The Libation Bearers, The Eumenides) by Aeschylus
  • Medea by Euripides
  • The Apology of Socrates by Plato
  • Crito by Plato
  • Selections from Invitation to the Classics
  • Oedipus the King
  • Antigone
  • Plato's Republic
  • Selections from Aristotle's Poetics
  • Selections from Aristotle's Politics
  • Alexander the Great
  • Selections from The Story of Civilization III: Caesar and Christ by Will Durant
  • The Punic Wars-Osprey Publishing
  • The Aeneid by Virgil
  • The Ancient Celts
  • On the Nature of Things by Lucretius
  • On Anger by Senaca
  • Church History in Plain Language
  • Foxe's Book of Martyrs
  • Gaellic Wars by Julius Caesar
History Presentations

Ancient History DVDs
  • That The World May Know: God Heard Their Cry with Ray VanderLaan
  • Raiders of the Lost Ark-although set in pre-WWII fighting Nazis, Egypt, pyramids, and the Ark of the Covenant are part of the story line.
  • Pyramid DVD from Unwrapping the Pharoahs
  • The Ten Commandments starring Charleton Heston
  • That the World May Know: Fire on the Mountainwith Ray VanderLaan
  • That the World May Know: Faith Lessons on the Promised Land with Ray VanderLaan
  • That the World May Know: Faith Lessons on the Kings and Prophets of Israel with Ray VanderLaan
  • The 300 Spartans (The really old version, made before I was born)
  • Alexander the Great (1956 with Richard Burton)
  • Drive Through History-Greece
  • Spartacus (with Kirk Douglas)
  • Cleopatra (with Elizabeth Taylor)
  • Julius Caesar (with Marlon Brando)
  • Ben Hur with Charleton Heston
  • The Robe (with Richard Burton)
  • Demetrius and the Gladiators (sequel to The Robe)
  • Drive Thru History-Rome
  • Faith Lessons on the Life and Ministry of the Messiah
  • Faith Lessons on the Death and Resurrection of the Messiah
  • Faith Lessons on the Early Church
  • Faith Lessons in the Dust of the Rabbi
  • Faith Lessons Walk as Jesus Walked
Ancient History Field Trips
  • Greek and Roman architecture and statues in Washington DC and the National Gallery of Art
  • Grecian/Roman/Neoclassical Urn at Colonial Williamsburg's DeWitt Wallace Musuem
Colonial Williamsburg Electronic Field Trips

Thursday, July 28, 2011

Friends from CW-May 2011

Guess who e-mailed this photo to me this evening? A kind lady who stumbled upon my blog today! She left a lovely comment and said she could send a picture of me with my kids with her granddaughter and two of the interpreters. Here we are!
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I have met many amazing people at Colonial Williamsburg and even because of Colonial Williamsburg! Sometimes they walk up to me in the historic area and say, "Aren't you Teacups in the Garden?" Other times they stumble upon my blog and we strike up a relationship, later meeting in CW. Then there are the times they stumble upon my blog and say, "I saw you and your family and wanted to meet you, but wasn't sure if I should interrupt your picnic lunch." This is the first time one of the guests sent me a picture! Thank you! This was a fun way to perk up my day!

Wednesday, July 27, 2011

Embroidery Colonial Williamsburg Milliner

Last month we visited the milliner shop at Colonial Williamsburg. There was a flurry of activity while the milliner chatted away with the numerous guests. The striped item in the bottom right corner of the photo are stays for a toddler.

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Meanwhile she was working on a linen petticoat.

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This is called "cutting by the thread."

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They were busily making pincushions.

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A completed saque back gown that I saw being sewn a few months ago.

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The coordinating stomacher...

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An embroidered pocket...

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A young girl's gown...

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Close up of the sleeve...

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Flowers for hat or stomacher decorating...

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Embroidery work in progress. I keep thinking she told me for a shoe...

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Tuesday, July 26, 2011

Iwo Jima Memorial-United States Marine Corps War Memorial

While we were in the area, I drove the kids to the Iowa Jima Memorial...
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Wednesday, July 20, 2011

Museum and Plants at Monticello with an Interlude of Lunch at Michie Tavern

Well, being laid up with my poor poor
feet has been b-o-r-i-n-g! I'm healing but still not at 100%. However last Saturday I felt good enough to adventure a teeny tiny bit to Monticello, a couple of hours away. In the mountains, or backwoods as some of the Colonial Williamsburg interpreters say, that is practically a neighborly distance! Our season passes were about to expire and we still hadn't done the museum. My husband packed my crutches into the van and loaded us up for a delightful day out and about!

As you enter the foyer of the museum, word play from Thomas Jefferson's writings are engraved in a circular manner on the floor in the foyer. Lights above playfully scatter more words around the huge circle.

To the right is the "Boisterous Sea of Liberty" room, where more word play happens on the main wall, with many plasma touch screens across the wall. We each took a screen to touch words that bounced in varying manner from top to bottom of the screen. We could touch any word we wanted, which brought up a window with details as words continued to playfully dance behind the window. Most of the windows of information was already known to me and the kids. It became a personal guessing game for us to predict what information would open with each word we touched. After about 15 minutes of playfully touching words and reading mini-histories, all the screens emptied out their words to start a fresh session. Nooooooo! We weren't done. In fact, we figured out that it is nearly impossible to catch every word, as they playfully scatter across the screen. We felt defeated that we couldn't touch every single word, bringing them to share the mini-history. Oh well.

We journeyed away from the Boisterous Sea across the engraved words with lighted words playfully hop scotching around, into a room featuring "Making Monticello." Here were displays on both Monticello I and Monticello II. Did you know that the Monticello we know today is not the original? Although we knew that, we now got to learn all about it through graphics and most impressive, a huge 3D model. The graphics at the link are in this room, but they do not do the 3D model justice. You have to go just to see the model, walk around it and inspect every fascinating angle of it. I don't think there is anything like it in the world. My husband has a degree in building construction, though his day job is telephones. That means his hobby is looking at architecture, so he naturally enjoyed this exhibit. I was surprised at how taken the kids were with it! They spent a lot of time analyzing the features of Monticello, comparing them to what they learned about Ancient Greek and Roman architecture in school.

I wore out in this room, so I hobbled outside with my crutches and went to the nursery area to find special plants. My previous post is about collections and one thing I collect are plants from historic sites, meaning that some of my plants is a descendant of one in the historic garden. The Center for Historic Plants works at Monticello to preserve and propogate Jefferson's original seed collection as well as other 19th century varieties grown in North America. I hoped to add some of Thomas Jefferson's plants to my garden and I found 3 in particular. Since I needed my husband to carry them so I put them on hold until the end of the day. I found a lovely bench among many to enjoy the modern gardens and rippling water feature. The doctor has banned me from pools, so that my poor foot can stay away from cold water. A water feature on a sunny 83 degree day is a safe thing to enjoy, which I did!

When the family came out of the museum to meet me, we were all hungry. We went to Michie's Tavern, which was my husband's request, down the hill from Monticello for lunch. One time we were visiting with the Colonial Williamsburg Thomas Jefferson and he was asked by one of the guests about Michie Tavern down the hill. His reaction was one of shock, because in his day, that tavern was located elsewhere. You can take a tour of the tavern to learn all about it!

You can also have lunch at the tavern. It's buffet style, 18th century food, all you can eat. One of the servers helped me take my food to a table in a garden room, with huge windows, allowing us to look out at the Blue Ridge Mountains.

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After a bit of window shopping and not buying anything, we returned to the Monticello museum to see the exhibit "Monticello as Experiment: To Try all Things." There were many fun things in this room! If you've been inside the Monticello mansion, perhaps you recall the amazing glass double doors in the parlour. One needs only push open or closed on one door and its partner simultaneously moves with it. At the link is a photo of the hands on display where you can see how it works. Now it all makes sense! There was a weather station area, where we could compare Saturday's weather to the same day, July 16, in Thomas Jefferson's time. We had a lovely day, in the low 80's. Couldn't ask for anything nicer. His day was in the high 60's! Can you imagine? In July? Also check the link for a hilarious 20 second clip, featuring an animated Thomas Jefferson (voice of the TJ interpreter at Colonial Williamsburg)! Jefferson was reknown for recording every little iota, jot and tittle in life, every day, from sun rise to sun set. That is humorously portrayed in this clip! He sort of glosses over some of the "little" details of his life (like writing the Declaration of Independence) so he can spend time on the "big" things in life (the weather report, the plant report, the food report...)!

I finished before the kids, so I hobbled back to enjoy sitting in the warmth among the gardens and water feature. When everyone was done, we did a bit of museum and nursery shopping then we went to the top of the mountain to enjoy the gardens. I decided to go slowly with my crutches and simply use the time to enjoy the scenery. I took my time to play with my camera to try to get the best shots I could of the Blue Ridge.

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The teepee shapes below, with vines growing up them, is the Caracala Bean, which I purchased for my garden.

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Afterwards we came home with a few souvenirs. Since we were all taken in some way with the architecture, I was delighted to find a related book. There are huge volumes on Jefferson's architecture on Monticello. One on Poplar Forest, etc, etc, etc. I found an all-in-one book! Thomas Jefferson Architect: The Built Legacy of our Third President by Hugh Howard is about all of his projects (Monticello, Poplar Forest, the Virginia state capitol, University of Virginia and more), beginning with his early influences of Tuckahoe in Richmond and the architecture in Williamsburg. Despite his early influences, it was Italy he was inspired by.

We now have 3 new plants in our gardens, to remember Thomas Jefferson by. One of my favorites from when I lived in Texas gardens is Dwarf Blue Plumbago. This is a lovely xeriscape plant, meaning it thrives in hot dry summers! Even in the heat, deep purple flowers bloom. As autumn nears, the foliage turns a reddish color. I have not been able to find these anywhere in Virginia, until I went to Monticello. Here it is in my garden this morning. You can even see a bit of copper beginning to appear in the leaf at 12 o'clock position. These act like ground covers so I got 3 others spaced around my Japanese Maple near the front door.

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I've been wanting a rose but prefer antique roses, like I grew in Texas. These are disease resistant, perfect for my busy lifestyle. To put it more romantically, these are the roses found along the roadside, in old church gardens, heavily draping cemetary borders, even profusely thriving, forgotten and tucked away in great great grandma's garden. As sadly neglected as they've been over the decades, they continue to thrive and bloom. I found one very much like one I loved in my Texas garden. Like Mutabilis, this blooms in several shades of peach to pink to crimson. My new rose is Comtesse du Cayla. Mine is in-between blooms right now, but you can see some lovely glimpses at the link.

Finally I have a plant from Jefferson's own 19th century garden. It's the utterly fascinating Caracalla bean, where the flower looks like a white/purple snail! Jefferson called it, "The most beautiful bean in the world..." It's on the edge of blooming, so check the link from Monticello!



Sunday, July 17, 2011

Under the Redcoat Colonial Williamsburg 2011

Under the Redcoat is a yearly reenactment hosted by Colonial Williamsburg that effectively brings history to life. The reenactment occurs at the end of June, the same time the Redcoats actually descended upon the quiet town of Williamsburg from June 25 to July 4, 1781, bringing it under martial law for nearly a week. As guests, we have an entire weekend to have fun with the Redcoats torturing them with the possibility that they might be able to arrest us, just to pop the password on them, which ensures that we have control over how much "play" we participate with the reenactment.

Seriously though, this is a vivid opportunity to comprehend our history readings of occupied cities suffering under martial law. For them there was no password for ease of escape. We might understand an aspect of that when reading a book or watching a movie, but going through this weekend, our senses are hightened as to what the citizens of Williamsburg (and others) have endured. It gets to the point where my kids and I seek quiet shelter to avoid the Redcoats. Join me as I recreate that weekend, for you to experience our experiences and emotions through this photojournal. Along the way we learned a few facts, dispelling some myths (the audacious Banastre Tarleton should thank me for this.)

The kids and I arrived one beautiful Friday morning, to meet some friends in the historic area. The skies were sunny. The weather wasn't too warm. Our friends were charming as always. What could possibly go wrong? After all in 1781, Williamsburg is a quiet little hamlet on Virginia's middle peninsula. The flurry of activity at the capitol has moved to Richmond Towne. With the burgesses went the hustle and bustle. Between that and the war, the economy is not good. Not so many taverns are open in town anymore. The bulk of the war has been fought in the north and to the south. We've heard news that Lafayette has come to Virginia with his dragoons to seek out the turncoat, Benedict Arnold. Benedict Arnold did occupy the town a few months before, in the spring. He is gone now. Hopefully Lafayette will find him. We've heard that the dreaded Banastre Tarleton is in the area. Surely we will be safe here.

To our dismay, we soon hear shouts that the Redcoats are coming. We are all rushed to the Capitol to gather. The Redcoats menacingly march in and surround us, guarding us with their guns, while the dreaded Banastre Tarleton arrives.

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Audaciously Banastre Tarleton informs us that he has liberated the town.
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If I'm liberated, why do I feel so threatened?
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Brashly Tarleton reads the orders that explain the rules of occupation. Then he had the audacity to call a boy from the crowd and give him a copy of the orders to post on his family's front door! Of course the boy didn't understand, so he was impressed, to the townspeoples' chagrin!
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They left and the town seemed safely quiet again. However we had been told more of the troops would arrive that afternoon. Oh my. As I watched them arrive up the street I felt impending doom. It seemed a bit cinematic to hear the doomsday beat of the drums. Were there drums? I felt drums going off in my heart, sinking to my stomach. Banastre Tarleton and his dragoons were in the lead, looming from the distance, at the end of the Duke of Gloucester Street. Behind him were scores of Redcoats and camp followers. It seemed surreal. With my heart in my throat, I didn't think to snap pictures until the last minute, from an angle, when they were upon me, which isn't as dramatic as when I saw them straight ahead from afar.
The dragoons...

The audacious Banastre Tarleton...
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The Redcoats...
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The Hessians...
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More Redcoats...

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Tarleton kept reminding the crowds that we should pay proper homage to the British troops, then he'd shout, "Hip, hip, huzzah!" to which we yelled "booooooo," causing Tarleton to shake his head. He must have been thinking, "It's going to be a long weekend."
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That evening I got my hands on a copy of the book, The Greatest Lawyer that Ever Lived: Patrick Henry at the Bar of History. In case I had any down time in the historic area the next day, I decided to pack it in my basket. I'd be in costume with my kids and if the Redcoats dared to search my basket, it would give them a bit of angst. If they are going to pick on me, then I'm quite up to the task of torturing them with some patriotic ferver, then when things get rough, I would subtly slip the password into my speech so I could be freed. This could be fun! ;)

The next morning we arrived and...there they were, en masse, receiving their orders for the day.
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We snuck away to check out their encampment...

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After walking through the encampment, we were greeted by Patrick Henry and I was interviewed by Best of the Road! The interviewer nodded his head to the British troops as he asked me if my husband was at war. We had a nice conversation while a camera whirred away. That was certainly a unique experience! Colonial Williamsburg is in a contest for Most Patriotic Small Town, which I wrote about at the above link.

Walking the back streets to avoid arrest by the Redcoats, we saw some friends and said hi. Our ultimate goal was to avoid Redcoats yet find an open store for some items that I needed, but none of them were open yet. We waited on the corner of Botetourt and Duke of Gloucester, in front of Tarpley's, innocently minding our business. All the trouble we have ever had was around the encampments, during the previous UTRs. We were perfectly safe in our shady spot, waiting for the store to open. Our confidence wavered as several Redcoats approached and asked why we were loitering. Loitering? Harshly he reminded me that the town was under martial law. I was speechless. My basket was sitting on the ground and one of the soldiers started rifling through it. Would he find the Patrick Henry book? He only poked the end of his rifle into it when we heard a shout come from behind us. "Leave them alone! They are trustworthy!" It was the coachman for St. George Tucker coming to our rescue! He had his horses, Brigadier and General at the hitching post on Botetourt, waiting for the next customers for his landau. Some of the soldiers yelled back to him, "How do we know we can trust you?" and they walked over to him while we yelled thanks to him. Meanwhile one of the soldiers, who had stayed with us, whispered to me, "You do know the password, don't you?" After we escaped that incident, the soldiers gleefully went in pursuit of other potential prisoners.

Finally Tarpleys opened. Immediately some Redcoats walked in. Oh brother. Well, there were things I needed so we walked in to find the proprietress talking about their selection of Creamware, patterned after Queen Charlotte's dishes. Wow! She was playing it safe. I have never had a presentation on Creamware when walking into Tarpley's before. Also, I am collecting the Creamware, myself. Queen Charlotte has good taste!

While I was in the back of the store, I saw some Redcoats approach my son and lead him outside. Oh dear. I abandoned my shopping and ran outside to find them going through the usual questioning. Where was my son's pass? How old was he? No! They are not enlisting him in their army! One of us blurted out the password and to their chagrin, they had to respectfully back off. My daughter exclaimed, "Didn't you just pick on us when we were across the street?" No, they hadn't seen us before. I replied, "Really? I thought you were part of that first group. All of you look the same." Uh oh, that was the wrong thing to say. I hastily pushed my kids into Tarpleys and we completed our shopping without further incident.

Later that morning, Banastre Tarleton led his dragoons and Redoats down the street to assemble at the Capitol.

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Lord Cornwallis came out on the balcony of the Capitol for a short speech.

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Afterwards we were privileged to watch the dragoon demonstration, led by the arrogant Banastre Tarleton. He taught us about the job of the dragoons, which is to be the eyes and ears, always aware, able to report important information to the commanders.

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Then we attended a review of Cornwallis and the troops.

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Later we went to the museum to listen to Banastre Tarleton talk about his background and to defend is case. A rumor has been going around accusing him of things he has not done. He insisted that he is not the blood thirsty destructive individual that the rumor reports. Tarleton presented the evidence, primary source documents...his letters relating his battlefield experiences of how he captured the American colors at the Battle of the Waxhaws.

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He also mentioned his disastrous defeat at the Battle of the Cowpens. That's a topic he prefers to avoid in conversation. His case is convincing. He admits to being "Swift! Vigilant! Bold!" Yes, he is arrogant, but "Butcher" he is not.

Later we went to the Courthouse to ask the generals and Col Tarleton questions about the occupation. As bothersome as the Redcoats can be, as audacious as I thought Tarleton was, the generals were really full of themselves, to the point of full blown irritation. I had several points of contention with Lord Cornwallis. I came quite close to challenging him on a few of his remarks, yet I hesitated because one of his aides rudely informed us before we began that they would tolerate no insubordination. My challenging Lord Cornwallis might have been seen as insubordination.

Someone asked Lord Cornwallis what would happen to us after the war, as in what punishments we would receive, if the British won. He told us that the British *would* defiinitely win. At that time, all patriots would be found, taken from their homes, and hung for treason. Really? It is said that 1/3 of Americans were patriot. He's going to hang 1/3 of the citizenry? The process of identifying patriots could become a witch hunt, like Salem in the late 17th century...like McCarthy in the 1950's. Even without that "little" scenario, what would the hanging of 1/3 of the population do to America's morale, among the remaining Tories and undecideds. I'm sure at that point, the 1/3 undecided would most certainly choose a side, most likely not to the King's liking. Of course Cornwallis didn't have the Reconstruction of the South after the Civil War to learn from, but the implications are worse. Cornwallis' attitude is not the way to restore colonies to the Crown. I was so frustrated, that I was telling my kids all this after we left the Courthouse but they kept telling me, "Shh! The Redcoats might overhear you."

At the end of the day we watched the review of the troops.


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The next morning we attended a drumhead church service at the Capitol, attended by Banastre Tarleton and his dragoons...

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the Redcoats...

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A drumhead church service is performed when the troops are on the move and cannot attend church in a building where the minister stands at the pulpit. While on the move, the minister stands behind drums.


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We had been nearly arrested numerous times by the Redcoats. Another memorable interrogation was when we walked the back streets and saw the Hessian guards ahead. I quickly reviewed my limited German. Hmmm, Auf Wiedersehen popped into my head. I couldn't remember what that meant. I remembered it from the "Sound of Music." It's the song the children sing at the dance. I tried running through the song quickly in my head when one of the Hessians stopped us. In broken English, with the German accent, I was asked if we had our passes, to which I replied "Non." Oops! I replied in Latin instead of German. Think, think. Then he asked if I had contraband in my basket. My Patrick Henry book was in the van. No contraband that day. I replied, "Nein." The Hessian asked me to lift the cover to my basket. I lifted my chintz fabric. He peered in. Disappointed, he let me pass on. "Danke shon," I thankfully replied as we walked off.

In the afternoon we watched the grand feasting of the officers. I asked her about all of the dishes and she was quite helpful in naming them, though I've forgotten many of them. I had missed the bigger feast the day before, since I had attended Banastre Tarleton's talk.

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After patrolling the streets, Banastre Tarleton went to the Courthouse. We were able to sneak in to overhear him and the generals plot to capture Lafayette. While strategizing, Lord Cornwallis' aide brought up the problems with The Battle of Cowpens, which Tarleton lost. The stung Tarleton requested they not talk about that. The aide quickly and rudely reprimanded him. Tarleton humbly admitted he had been put in his place. The generals were not at all settling well with me. They kept bragging that they were gentlemen, but I wasn't seeing it.

At the end of the day, the British left, on a mission to capture Lafayette. The occupation of Williamsburg has ended.

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