Sunday, October 31, 2010

Ancient Egyptians Rhetoric History Presentation

While we dressed as Ancient Egyptians (which took over an hour since everything that could go wrong with costumes did!) my husband started going through our books! He's not a book guy at all, so I was quite shocked when I caught him red handed, especially since they are pretty deep! He said they gave him an idea of what to expect from us!

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Finally, at long last, we were dressed and in one piece! Our costumes are based on research on actual Egyptian garments from around 1400BC. I designed the fabric wrapping and the kids made the collars and belt. Details on that later. We each came up with our own interpretations and wrote our own monologues, based on all the knowledge we acquired from the books in the above photo!
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We opened our program upstairs at the piano, I mean "Egyptian stringed instrument". First we lit the candles, which were used throughout the entire unit celebration.  Then I played a Hebrew song, "Alleluia Adonai." This became the theme of my interpretation.
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After we sang through the song twice, I stood up and began my interpretation.

Adonai. Lord. The one true God. Do you know Him? Have you met Him? We did.  He so changed our lives that we were compelled to follow the Hebrews on their Exodus from Egypt. Our story is obscure.  Moses recorded in Exodus 12:38 "Many other people went up with them..." Come hear our story. Follow us to our ancient civilization of Egypt.

Then we picked up our candles (my daughter has some trouble managing a candle while being in costume, so she didn't carry one.  If you do this, please be careful with kids and candles.) and journeyed down the stairwell, into the basement, through the stage curtains, into Ancient Egypt.  We set our candles on the coffee table and I resumed my interpretation. 

What is civilization? How did it begin?  Where did the orgins of man begin? We thought we knew the stories from our gods.  However Moses has taught us the true story. let me tell you.

"In the beginning, God created the heavens and the earth..."

It is said that the earth was one land mass with a great sea. When sin took over the earth, God put Noah and his family on an ark to protect them during a horrific world wide flood. The "springs of the deep burst forth and the floodgates of the heavens were opened" (Gen 7:11) for 40 days and nights.  This was no gentle rain. The fury of the water was horrific, gouging out the land. Earthquakes rumbled from within the earth. Volcanoes exploded with fury. God's judgment was evident. After the deluge, after the waters receded, the land was transformed. The land had torn apart and now were many. God, the original architect, created intruiguing land features. Mountains climbed to the sky, canyons dug into the earth, waterfalls roared down mountain walls...mighty rivers gave life.

Civilizations rose near these rivers...one from whom the Hebrews' forefather, Abraham, came...Mesopotamia in the Fertile Crescent, a bountiful region bounded by the mighty Tigris and Euphrates Rivers. Here man, the mortal architect, created towering edifices to their gods.  The one true God cast judgment upon the peoples, confusing their languages, causing them to scatter.

Many left the fertile region, crossing the desert to find another fertile area to survive.  My ancestors found another mighty river, the Nile.  They discovered that it floods every year. Amazingly, instead of bringing destruction, it brought life. Any land the flood touches becomes fertile. We count on that inundation every year. We have built our entire civilization around it. The Nile is truely a gift, without which we would die. Because our very lives depended on this river, we came to worship it. We are powerful because of the Nile. Our enemies cannot reach us. There are too many obstacles. They must cross a parched desert which means certain death. If they attempt to reach us on the Nile from the south, the cataracts will impede their progress, as would arriving from the Mediterranean through the delta in the north. Impeded progress means our army has time to attack and conquer. We were invincible! Or so we thought.

We also worshipped our pharoah, who we've been taught is the sun god. He brings light and life. He protects us and brings the yearly inundations. Pharoah is powerful. Or so we thought, until Moses, once Prince of Egypt, began to speak for the God of the Hebrews. His God brought ten devasting plagues on our land. The first one turned the Nile to blood. Then frogs, the god of fertility, overtook the land. Darkness descended on the land. Our first borns died. All of our gods were proven futile. With each plague, my faith in Egyptian gods grew less, while my faith in the Hebrew God grew strong. I told Moses that his God was my God. I asked if I could follow the Hebrews out of the land of Egypt. His people made room for me.

Alleluia Adonai.

That led directly into a verbal interchange between me and the kids, using information from our devotions.

Me: Who is God?

Daughter: Elohim. In the Hebrew language, El means mighty or strong. Him is plural for three or more. Genesis 1:1 "In the beginning, God (the three in one) created the heavens and the earth."

Me: Who is God?

Son: El Elyon, God Most High. Gen 14:20 "Blessed be Abram by God Most High, Creator of heaven and earth."

Me: Who is God?

Daughter: El Roi, the God Who Sees. Gen 16:13 "She gave this name to the Lord who spoke to her, 'You are the God who seems me.'"

Me: Who is God?

Son: El Shaddai, the All-Sufficient One. Gen 17:1-2 "When Abram was ninety-nine years old the Lord appearedd to him and said, 'I am God Almighty, walk before me and be blameless. I will confirm my covenant between me and you and will greatly increase your numbers."

Me: Who is God?

Daughter: Adonai, Sovereign Lord, to whom we must bow the knee. Gen 15:2 "But Abram said, 'O Sovereign Lord..."

Me: Who is God?

Son: Jehovah, to be, permanent existence. Ex 3:14-15 "God said to Moses, 'I AM WHO I AM. This is what you are to say to the Israelites: I AM has sent me to you." God also said to Moses, "Say to the Israelites, 'The Lord, the God of your fathers-the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac and the God of Jacob-has sent me to you.' This is my name forever, the name by which I am to be remembered from generation to generation.'"

Then my daughter began her monologue.  She wrote this herself and I gave her some ideas on using the basket.  She decided to portray the Egyptian mother of Moses.   

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I have tried to insert video but to no avail.  This new blogging platform obviously does not support it.  It's really a shame because the  flow of the gown on my daughter was beautiful as she did a memorized interpretation as the Egyptian mother of Moses.

Then she answered questions from my husband.

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Then my son did his interpretation. He had decided to be a master architect for Egypt.  Here are the architectual plans he had to abandon because of the bad economy from the ten plagues!

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Again, after hours of trying, this blogging platform does not support video.  It's a shame, because my son lived and breathed his part.  Oh well.  I know that it's the grandparents who want the videos so I'll upload them to disc.  My kids worked from outlines (IEW KWO) so I cannot post their words here. However they did a great job assimilating all the content they learned into a first person interpretation. 

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Then he answered my husband's questions.
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Each of our interpretations told how the plagues convinced us that we needed to turn to the one true God. Back in character, I transitioned us to the next part of our journey:  We followed the Hebrews on the Exodus from Egypt. We journeyed to Mount Sinai where Moses received the law from God, which required obedience to the Holy One.  While there he also received direction on how the Hebrews were to celebrate the various Feasts. Come, join us in the Sinai Desert to learn about these feasts. However I must warn you that after we set out to enter the Promised Land, there was distrust among most of the spies, causing the people to doubt that God could safely lead them in to their new home.  As a result, we are wandering in the wilderness for 40 years.  Information about the feasts are scattered throughout the "desert."  It will be up to you (my husband) to find them. In the meantime we'll undoubtedly wander and be led astray. (Which would recreate the 40 years wandering through the desert.)  We took up our candles, and went upstairs to the desert. After a bit of wandering, he found the first stop.

(Touring with the candles gave incredible atmostphere whereas the wandering through the "desert" to find and experience each of the feasts helped us to apply the concepts.  I'm going to try to incorporate this type of thing to more unit celebrations. My husband really enjoyed it and engaged him more. We enjoyed it too!  I took the photos before our unit celebration and my camera doesn't always "see" in the dark. But trust me, the atmosphere was definitely there. )

Sabbath/Shabbot-We set our candles down.  Sabbath is celebrated weekly, from Friday sunset to Sat sunset, which comes from the reference for "day" in Genesis 1, "and there was evening and morning, one day."  The Hebrew significance is to have a day of rest for all. My daughter read Gen 2:2-3. My son explained how "we" ate manna, how we could only collect as much as we needed, yet we were to collect double in preparation for Sabbath.  Since we had to eat all there was and have no left overs, there were 4 pieces of pita bread covered in honey (to represent manna). After we ate it, my husband asked if manna was really that crispy. My son piped up and said if it was roasted! I found my moment to say what I've been wanting to incorporate.  As the Egyptian I said, "I helped write what you would call a cookbook titled: 101 Ways to Cook Manna and Quail"  My husband loved it!

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Passover/Pesach-A spring feast, I explained the Hebrew calendar system which was different from what my husband was familiar with.  The Hebrew significance was to remember the original Passover, when the death angel passed over the Hebrew homes in the tenth plague.  My son read Ex 12:1-14.  The Messianic significance is that Yeshua, the Passover Lamb, was crucified on Passover, to atone for sin.  The display was of a typical Passover Seder, which my son explained, a bone from the lamb, unleavened bread, and bitter herbs.

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Feast of Unleavened Bread/Chag HaMatzah-Celebrated in the spring, the Hebrew significance was to remember when the Hebrews left Egypt in haste, before their bread could rise. Also leaven represents sin in the Bible.  My daughter read Ex 12:17-20. The Messianic Significance was Yeshua's burial; He was sinless.  The display was unleavened bread. The kids explained what the markings on the Matzo cracker represented.

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Feast of Firstfruits/Ha Bikkurim-Another spring festival, the Hebrew significance was that they would wave the barley firstfruit offerings to recognize God's bounty. They did not use their crop until this was done. It taught their farmers that their crops belonged to God. My son read Ex 23:9-14. The Messianic significance was Resurrection Day! Yeshua presented Himself to God as the firstfruits from the dead.  My daughter read I Cor 15:20-23.  I found a bundle of grain at the craft store that looks like barley!
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Feast of Weeks/Shavuot-Another spring feast, the Hebrew significance was that this was a harvest festival honoring God with Thanksgiving as opposed to pagan religions honoring nature with child sacrifices and orgies.  My son read Lev 23:15-21.  The Messianic significance was that this was fulfilled on Pentacost (a Greek word) when the Holy Spirit descended on the disciples. Acts 2 The display is of flowers and pot pourri to represent the Ten Commandments, which according to the Hebrews, fill the world with fragrance.  During these feast days,  dairy food is enjoyed to represent the land flowing with milk and honey.

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Feast of Trumpets/Rosh HoShanah-A fall festival, the Hebrew significance was that this was originally set aside as a day of rest, for  getting right with God.  Trumpets were blown with staccato notes, to represent the need to break away from sin. My daughter read Lev 23:23-25. With the fall of the temple in 70AD, it has been redesigned to be the New Year.  Ancient peoples often celebrated the new year in the autumn.  The Messianic significance is the return of Christ. My son read I Thess 4:16-17. The display included a shofar my son made 4 years ago.  Also we followed the Hebrew custom and ate apple slices dipped in honey and said, "Be it Thy will that a good and sweet year be renewed upon us."
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Yom Kippur/Day of Atonement-Another fall feast, the Hebrew significance was a time of cleansing for priests, the people and the Holy Place. My daughter read Lev 23:26-32. The Messianic significance is the future judgment day when Yeshua intercedes for us. On the day of His death, at the moment the High Priest killed the sacrifice, the curtain in the temple tore in two, to represent that Yeshua was the final sacrifice for Yom Kippur.  My son read Matt 27:50-51.  Our display was an empty basket, because this was time of fasting, not only from food but also from things like fragrances, vehicles, work, etc.

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Feast of Tabernacles/Sukkot-A fall festival, the Hebrew significance is a week of celebration to recall 40 years in tents and the annual crop harvest.  My daughter read Lev 23:33-43.  The Messianic significance is the future when God tabernacles with us.  My son read Rev 21:3.  The display should be branches and vines in the form of a temporary shelter.  Our trees are too little to prune! Also pruning this time of year could kill the trees. (We had our first frost last night.)  We used our canopied table on the deck to represent the shelter. Often these shelters had a harvest display.  This is thought to be the precursor to our Thanksgiving. I would have loved to have dinner out here to end the unit celebration, but it was too cold for us Egyptians!

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I decided to bring the outdoors in, with the idea of this temporary shelter made of branches and vines and overhead openings peaking at the stars in the sky.  I put flowers in my chandelier.  The previous homeowners stenciled flowers on the ceiling. I meant to ask my husband to string our white Christmas lights on the ceiling to be stars, but I forgot.   I made beeswax candles, super easy! The kids were going to help but my daughter was busy in the kitchen and my son was busy with his belt, so I whipped these out in about 5 minutes so we could finally get dressed!  Candles are used all the time in these Hebrew feasts.  I thought beeswax were a natural element the Hebrews could have done in the ancient days. I read they are supposed to smell like honey but I didn't notice that.  I'll detail how I made them in a future post.

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Our menu included something representative from each of the feasts, in a modern menu.  We always pass by the Kosher aisle but aren't always familiar with the feast foods.  I'll detail more on this later.
  • Sabbath-Challah bread
  • Passover-Matzo Ball soup and charoset
  • Feast of Weeks-Cheesecake
  • Feast of Tabernacles-Stuffed green peppers with barley, filled pastries

 My son decided to use the collars as part of the table decoration.  I put our feast books on the table for reference for all the questions my husband was asking about which foods went with each feast, etc.

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Thursday, October 28, 2010

The Ten Commandments

Our DVD copy of the Ten Commandments has extra features, where we get to go behind the scenes.  I like to watch these with the kids, as a sort of extra literary technique or even more, fine arts in depth.  They often talk about the very things that I studied in college in my theater fine arts appreciation class.

Charlton Heston, who was cast as Moses, told the story that he also wanted to be the voice of God.  Because God spoke one on one  with Moses, Heston imagined the voice of God coming from within Moses. Did you ever notice that was Heston's voice? 

Cecil B. DeMille found out that Heston's wife was pregnant.  When the Hestons' baby boy was born, the same day in the hospital, Heston said they received a telegram from DeMille stating, "Congratulations! He's got the part."  Charleton Heston's son played the part of baby Moses.

I've been reading Josephus as we study the Bible for the history.  I noted during the movie some aspects of DeMille's interpretation that reminded me of Josephus, particularly the part where Moses, the Prince of Egypt, returns from conquering lands.  There was a segment where DeMille said that he read Josephus in writing the screen play! It helped him come up with a story line for the parts that the Bible does not cover. Nevertheless there are additional fictionalized parts to the DeMille production, but it is incredible how many things he got right or at least based on documentation.

I read elsewhere that DeMille was determined to make this a grand epic to the glory of God. He was near death in the making of the movie.  He collapsed partway through the making of it and I think he managed to return. He did not live much longer after the movie though. It was wonderful to hear testimony from the different actors as to how wonderful it was to work with him.

My favorite line in the movie was "So it is written, so it shall be done."  Look for it!  Repeated elements are key in literary (or movie) analysis.  It is the theme. DeMille was trying to say something.  It is throughout the movie and as I recall (it's been a few weeks since I saw it) at the end.  Look for how it ties together!

Wednesday, October 27, 2010

CW EFT The Will of the People Part II

Recently the Emmy Award winning Colonial Williamsburg Electronic Field Trip, The Will of the People, aired in a timely manner. Being close to midterm elections, the focus was on the suprisingly contested election between Thomas Jefferson and his running mate, Aaron Burr.  The actual election was between Jefferson and John Adams. However back then the Electoral College voted for people individually instead of as teams.  To everyone's shock, Jefferson and Burr tied!  That meant that Burr, who was originally running as Jefferson's vice-president, could become the third president! 

Originally broadcast two years ago, I have a blog post about my kids' experiences with the e-mailing of Thomas Jefferson and on-line activities here.  CW EFT provides a full array of activities in the teacher resources.  This time, we focused on new activities before redoing some old favorites!  There are numerous links provided for further exploration on topics about Jefferson, elections, presidents and the electoral college. One of the favorites was a Constitution Quiz that my kids took on-line.  My son and daughter scored 90% and 100% respectively! They read primary source documents ranging from the writings of Thomas Jefferson to those of Alexander Hamilton, in the Federalist Papers.

Another favorite activity was to participate in the new CW EFT message board where CW historians answer student on-topic questions throughout the year!  The new format is a huge improvement over the old one.   In the old one we needed passwords that somehow got gunked up last year so we couldn't do it at all.  Now it is simply accessed by the kids via a link and this time questions were posted by the historians to get the kids thinking!

Of course the on-line vote is a must, as well as the computer activities. I confess I ban computer and other type media games in this house.  However the CW EFT computer activities are so well crafted, they are welcome into our classroom as a monthly EFT treat!  I detailed these at my post of the original broadcast!  These were superbly done!  

Before the activities, we read together the background information to get our bearings on the various aspects of the political science history that would be presented in the EFT.  One of the guests who answered student questions on this years EFT (and the previous viewing) was a political science professor from Christopher Newport University.  He and a CW historian answered questions along with Thomas Jefferson, for students who phone called live during the broadcast of the EFT.

What can be more thrilling than an e-mail from Thomas Jefferson, himself?  My kids each e-mailed him and received informative replies.  My kids' noted that President Jefferson must have been tired, because in his time frame, he would have signed "Your Most Humble and Obedient Servant"

Is there anything in particular that you would like to see done while
you are president?


He replied:

My Dear ___________,

Peace, prosperity and the expansion of our great nation are three of the most important goals I want to pursue during my presidency.

Since gaining our freedom from England, our country has attempted to avoid conflict with other countries.  Since becoming the United States, We have been pressured by both France and England but thus far we have been able to steer clear of open warfare.  I fear our greatest challenge comes from England and will work through diplomatic channels to stay out of war.

I believe our prosperity lies in the farmer and not the businessman.  I envision a country of farmers producing their goods for consumption in this country and for export to other countries.  Our land is vast and fertile and well suited to agriculture.  Agriculture also involves the labor of many people and I believe it is the direction best suited for our country.

We currently occupy just a small part of these lands that make up the United States.  There are great opportunities lying to the expansive central and western territories and I would like to conduct exploratory journeys to see what lies beyond our present borders.  I plan to work with our congress to fund such a journey to explore this land.
Thank you for your question,
Th: Jefferson


My son asked two questions:

President Jefferson,

What could happen if anyother tie occurs between presenditial
candidates and it is not resolved before Inauguration Day?


When John Adams censored the newspapers with the Alien and Sedition
Act, did anyone bring it to the Supreme Court?


President Jefferson replied in full detail:

Dear ______________, The possibility of another tie for the office of President was removed during my Presidency with the ratification of the 12th Amendment to the Constitution. The Amendment require that Electors designate their votes for a President and Vice President so the protocol of the highest number of votes determined the president and the second highest votes determined vice-president. A tie for president goes to the House of Representatives who will consider selecting the president from the top three candidates. It was the House of Representatives who finally resolved the election in which I was declared President.
The Alien and Sedition acts were challenged by the States of Virginia and Kentucky in the form of Resolutions by their respective legislatures in November & December of 1798 which Resolutions condemned the acts. Many people believed that the Acts were unconstitutional. Eventually, the Congress repealed the acts and put to an end their suppression of freedom of speech.


Thank  you for your question,

Th: Jefferson

Be sure to tune in to the next CW EFT: The Bill of Rights (my kids and I were extras in it!)  You can subscribe at a reasonable price and receive a great educational value from Homeschool Buyer's Co-op.

Sunday, October 24, 2010

Colonial Williamsburg Costume Design Center Open House 2010

Friday was the Colonial Williamsburg Costume Design Center's Open House, celebrating their 75th anniversary. We ate a quick early lunch then went to the Costume Design Center.  Half of the ladies who work there remembered us from last year's open house!  The other half gave really nice greetings, since I had taken 9 sewing classes with them this year!  I even got a couple of hugs!

In the entry were mannequins on display with costumes.  There was even a living costumed person.  Her story is neat. She was recently hired to work there and everyone said, "Hmmmmm, you look like you would fit in the Lady Dunmore gown."  Wow! I was trying not to be jealous!
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On one of the first tables, I saw a red coat dated 1769.  I had a suspicion it might have the same back that I struggled with on my son's coat.  I turned the coat over and I was right!  Later coats have a solid back from top to bottom.  Mid century coats had a seam line in the middle of the back.  A bit different from the cut of my son's coat, it has a square.  This is what the tailor told me to do, if I had to, to alleviate any further problems with my son's coat.  Now I have a visual of the square.  Technically I should do this to my son's coat, because I did not make the slash marks for this seam symmetrical. I have no idea how that happened but it did. Now I have my reference photo for research and application.
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Here's a close up of the square. The white thread might throw you, but in the colonial era they didn't worry much about matching thread colors.

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As I walked through the CDC, my focus was to question cloaks and regimentals. There was a dorset button demo table but I had taken a class on that.  I thought I'd do a quick run through, focus on the cloaks and regimentals, then go back and focus on areas I had skipped. I never got it all done despite my being there most of the day.

I loved this gown.  Quite close to my color!

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Ahh, now here's a cloak!  This one is interesting in that it has a waistcoat (inner panel) that fastens with death head buttons.

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I stopped at the covered button demo table.  I had taken a class on these but I knew there could be some fine tuning.

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I asked about the shank on the back and she gave us a demo.  She also gave me an instruction sheet on it.  Here are her buttonholes.

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Then we went to another room where I saw one of my past instructors working on the embroidery machine. Looking at these just makes me want to do them by hand!  My grandmother taught me embroidery while I was growing up. After awhile I got tired of the embroidery projects but this is a new challenge! You can see the embroidery pattern next to the product.

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This piece of fabric is inspiration for a future embroidery piece.

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This is organist Peter Pelham's vest! We've met him before!

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I started asking about regimentals and I was directed to the military costume expert.  I am probably more comfortable with military costuming than any other part of colonial sewing.  I've made two previous Lafayette coats.  In fact, last Tuesday Lafayette himself asked why my son wasn't wearing his regimentals.  My son has outgrown his latest Lafayette coat.  He'd also like it to be more accurate.  Hence all my questions! This was Lafayette coat research day! There were CDC patterns available for sale and I asked if the coat pattern could be reasonably adaptable for the Lafayette coat, especially considering I have used contemporary patterns for the previous coats.  I was directed to the fitter, who was also the knowledge base of military costuming. She put a muslin coat on my son and pinned in places that should be taken in. She had a mock up of the pattern upon which she sketched out these alterations for my son's size.  I took lots of pictures of the fitting.  I had suspected that the pleating of the tails on the Lafayette coat were a tad less than a regular coat. She confirmed that and marked it on the pattern mock up, which I'd get to keep for reference.  We also talked about differences between an officer's coat  and enlisted.

With the muslin coat on, we got to talking about the cut of his waistcoat, which she said was more for enlisted.  She got a muslin with the proper cut for a Lafayette waistcoat.  She started pinning that one up for alterations.

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Then the muslin coat went back on over the muslin waistcoat and she pinned the alterations on that.  Then she measured all the changes and sketched that onto the pattern mock up.

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As I asked lots of questions about specifics on sewing the Lafayette coat, one of the other ladies got a senior fife and drum corps coat for me to see.  The fitter had my son try that on!  She had no idea that my son plays the fife in his free time, so this was a thrill for him.  Had we been able to move to CW years ago, we would have signed him up for the fife and drum corps.

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Then we asked the big question.  We've figured out that those blue facings can be undone and buttoned to the other side. Washington does his coat this way all the time but we've never seen Lafayette do it with his.  My son wanted me to work it out on his Lafayette coat last year but the curve was too deep to make it work because of the pattern I had used.  She showed how the buttoning worked and I could see the difference!

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I also decided to order a jacket pattern for myself. Why not?  That should save me from having to fit upon myself, which is *impossible!*  I asked about that and was told that was a good idea.  I asked which jacket was the toile based on. I like toile and especially love this one...all flowers, very subtle. My son fussed later, "But Mom, it ties in front!  That would make you a middling sort!"  Well it's easy and would be fast.  A gown takes far longer and when do I have time to sew for me when he is always outgrowing everything I make for him????  My son really wants me to start on my costumes. He says he'd have so much more fun if we were all dressed up.
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After being shown the pattern, I was measured and put into a mock up.  Wow, that was my first time to wear an 18th century style item and I could definitely feel the difference.   

Our next stop was accessories.  The first table had lots of things I learned to make in my sewing classes, so I went around the corner with my son. My daughter, however, stayed behind to ask questions.  I was glad that she was doing some of her own research about period accurate hat pins!




Meanwhile my son and I were studying military stuff!  Here we found the sword and military stock!
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It was time for the CDC to close and we never did it all.  However we did learn a a lot. I took a lot of notes!

We walked into the historic area and saw Benedict Arnold on Botetourt dealing with a lot of teenagers.  I thought I should say something but my kids wouldn't let me!

We walked on to the milliners to continue my cloak research. I'll save that for a milliner post!  The tailor wasn't in so I'll show him my son's coat another time.

We saw the end of Revolutionary City.  Isn't Benedict Arnold the very picture of audacity? (What a great actor!) A red sash, like the one he wears around his waist, was on display at the CDC in the accessory room. Visiting the CDC is wonderful, in that we can handle reproductions of historical clothing. Being in the historic area, brings that clothing to life!

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I am really thrilled about the patterns that will be coming. The CDC will print out the proper sizes and snail mail them to me.  Hopefully I can use them well. What a wonderful opportunity to get specific direction for each one.  I feel like a lot of thinking has been done for me. Of course I'll still have to adapt the Lafayette specific details on my own, like the buff reveres, but I've done that before.  The epaulettes are done. I need only transfer them from the previous coat.  Hmmmm, I hope!  I wonder if they'll still fit the shoulder length?  We'll see!

I hope that  sewing with the CDC and visitation opportunites at the CDC will continue in the future.